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Workplace Injuries Archives

Method for repairing water pipes may be hazardous

Oklahoma construction workers who repair water pipes may be interested to learn that a common procedure used to do the repairs may actually release hazardous chemicals into the air. As such, researchers from Purdue University said that the method should be re-evaluated to determine what the risks are for workers, the environment and the public.

The importance of safety procedures in manufacturing

In Oklahoma manufacturing plants, productivity is often seen as one of the highest priorities. However, the plant workers are critical when it comes to a manufacturing plant's productivity as they are responsible for manipulating the machinery and handling a variety of materials. These types of jobs can expose employees to serious injuries.

How to reduce accidents in trenches

Proper safety and supervision programs are vital to keeping Oklahoma trench workers safe. A single cubic yard of dirt weights about 3,000 pounds, which is enough to crush a person. While fatal trenching accidents doubled in 2016, OSHA says that they can be prevented by following its safety protocols. Keeping employees safe may also be a way for owners and managers to avoid liability.

Wearables could support workplace safety and injury recovery

Wearable activity trackers that monitor heart rate and count steps have become popular in Oklahoma, but technology developers have proposed expanded roles for smart personal medical monitors in the workplace. A presentation given at a conference described how wearable technology could assist workplace safety managers. More advanced devices on workers could collect data about body mechanics. Managers could use this information to evaluate injury risks and work toward prevention.

OSHA rule on falls questioned due to fall safety provision

Oklahoma workers may be aware that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration updated its rule to help prevent workplace falls. The final rule became effective on Jan.17, 2017. However, one of the key provisions is being questioned as OSHA now allows people to work near the edge of low-slope roofs without proper fall protection as long as the work is infrequent and temporary.

Protecting minors from workplace injuries

During the summer, many Oklahoma teenagers opt to get a job to earn some money while they are out of school. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, however, they are at risk for serious injuries due to a lack of inadequate safety training, unsafe equipment and lack of supervision.

Union report highlights dangers workers face

Oklahoma residents may be interested to know that 150 American workers die each day from preventable work-related injuries and illnesses. This was according to a report released by the AFL-CIO. This translates to 4,836 workers who died from workplace injuries while another 50,000-60,000 died from occupational diseases. Furthermore, the number of immigrant workers who died on the job was at its highest levels in almost a decade. In 2015, 943 immigrant workers were killed, which was the most since 2007.

OSHA campaigns to prevent fall fatalities in the workplace

For Oklahoma construction workers, falls are still one of the leading causes of fatalities in their occupation. Many employees and employers still fail to use proper fall protection equipment. In an effort to reduce the number of tragic incidents, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration launched an annual campaign to raise awareness about workplace fall hazards.

Staying safe while using stepladders at work

Regardless of their occupation, it is likely that many Oklahoma workers will be required to use a stepladder at some point, even if it is just for hanging decorations for an office party. While stepladders are seen as simple devices to use, there is still a risk of injury. In that regard, the Canadian Center for Occupation Health and Safety has offered advice to keep employees safe.

The hazards of grain storage facilities

Oklahoma has hundreds of livestock farms and ranches of all sizes, many of which have storage facilities for grain and other feed. A study that is conducted annually by Purdue University tracks the number of accidents connected to grain handling, and its report for 2016 has revealed a significant increase in fatalities over the previous year.

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