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Posts tagged "Workplace Injuries"

Radiologists often suffer from work-related back ailments

According to the American College of Radiology, lower back pain affects one-third of U.S. radiology professionals. In many cases, technology is to blame for such ailments. Oklahoma radiologists often have to sit for long periods of time in front of a computer.

Pinch points: a major workplace hazard

Employers in Oklahoma, especially those in the construction and manufacturing industry, will want to know what pinch points are. Various OSHA state offices have been warning about these because they're a frequent source of workplace injuries. Pinch points are areas in machinery where workers, or parts of their body, are liable to get stuck. They could be areas between two moving parts, between a stationary part and a moving part, or between a material and part of a machine.

Eye safety: a major concern among workers

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 eye injuries occur every year in Oklahoma and the rest of the U.S. Among serious injuries, such as those leading to permanent eye damage and blindness, 40 percent arise in the construction, manufacturing, and mining industries. OSHA estimates that eye injuries cost companies a total of $300 million every year in workers' compensation benefits, lost productivity, and medical expenses.

Study finds that mental health may affect work safety for women

Female workers in Oklahoma might be more likely to be injured at work if they are suffering from fatigue or mental health issues. According to a study that appeared in the "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine," anxiety, depression and fatigue may all increase the likelihood that a woman will be injured at work. Male employees do not appear to be affected in the same way.

Reducing work injuries in warehouses

In Oklahoma and elsewhere in the U.S., warehouses and factories tend to have higher injury rates than other workplaces. OSHA has listed 10 of the most common risk factors in warehouses; they include forklifts, electrical wiring, improper lockout/tagout procedures, poor hazard communication and floor wall openings. Fires, explosions and exposure to harmful chemicals are also frequent causes of injury.

Workplace injuries up, with transportation incidents topping list

Workplace fatalities are continuing to increase, according to a report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Approximately one out of every four fatal injuries on the job are due to transportation incidents, the top cause of workplace incidents. Employees in Oklahoma and throughout the United States are also at an increased risk of experiencing injuries due to workplace violence and exposure to harmful substances, although injuries attributed to fires and explosions are on the decline.

Deaths on the job rise for third year straight in 2016

Residents of Oklahoma may be concerned about the danger of workplace injuries, particularly after the release of a report about fatalities related to on-the-job accidents in 2016. During the year, workplace fatalities rose for the third consecutive year in a row, reaching a total of 5,190. This is the highest number of workplace deaths in the United States since 2008, when 5,214 workers were killed on the job. During 2016, workers lost their lives at a rate of 14 per day to workplace injuries and accidents.

Workplace fatalities increase, according to BLS census

In Oklahoma and across the United States, workplace injuries are a common occurrence. According to a 2016 census by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workplace accidents led to 5,190 fatalities, a 7 percent increase from 2015 and the highest number since 2008. This amounts to 14 workers being killed every day.

Delays in the injury and accident reporting rules

Many Oklahomans are injured each year while they are working. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is the federal agency tasked with enforcing safety regulations. The agency's new injury and illness reporting requirements, which would make companies submit reports of injuries and illnesses electronically to the agency, have been delayed.

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